Tag Archives: phytonutrients

Snowstorm Staple Miso Ramen

Are you ready for the storm? I braved the crowds at the Park Slope Food Co-op yesterday and made off with all of the kale about a dozen Amy’s Vegan Breakfast Burritos. But most importantly, as ever, I have a stash of Dr. McDougall’s Right Foods soups on hand.

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I buy bulk packages on Amazon– my favorites are the Miso Ramen, Soy Ginger Noodle and Pad Thai. They’re all delicious, healthful and satisfying. And of course vegan, and certainly not fried like those awful blocks I ate as a kid.

While they’re marvelously flavorful, I rarely eat them as-is. I need me some greens, and a lot of broth. So to extend the broth I add additional miso paste. Then I jazz things up with some tofu, seitan (Uptons, of course!) or TVP. Sometimes several of the aforementioned items.

The kale from the Park Slope Food co-op shines above all other kale!

The kale from the Park Slope Food co-op shines above all other kale!

These soups are winter staples so I’ll try to post more of my quick and dirty “recipes” for each soup. (and perhaps, my favorite convenience meals in general.) Let’s begin with the Miso Ramen. The easiest, fastest comfort food around!

 

Ingredients:

1 Cup Dr. McDougall’s Right Foods Miso Ramen

White and Red Miso Paste (I prefer Miso Master)

1 tsp dried Wakame seaweed

Upton’s Seitan

TSP (Texturized Soy Protein)

1 tsp sesame seeds

Lacinato kale

Directions:

Steam kale, reserving the cooking water. Boil some additional water in a kettle, about 2 cups.

Get thee a large bowl. Add about 2 tsp white miso and 1 tsp red miso in the bowl (beware- if you don’t like salt or have high blood pressure, skip the extra miso and water!) Add 2 Tbsp hot water to the miso paste and whisk with a fork.

Add contents of soup cup (noodles and flavor packet,) 1 Tbsp TSP and dried seaweed to your bowl.

Pour your (just boiled) cooking water into the bowl. Stir and check the flavor. If too thin, add more miso. If too strong, add more water. Cover with a plate or lid. Let stand for 1 minute or till noodles are soft.

Chop the kale while noodles soften, then uncover and add your kale and sesame seeds. Slurp.

 

Stay warm and dry people!

 

 

Becoming Greener

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Greetings dear VVP Potluckers! Hope you’re not full-up on smoothies yet-  I beseech you to give just one more a go. Our featured ingredient (by way of orange) sings along with spinach, pineapple and coconut water in the recipe below my “green awakening” story. Enjoy, and happy potlucking!

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. I was scared of green smoothies until just this past summer. Kind of hard to believe, considering the fact that I love greens, I love my Vitamix, and I’m a vegan nearly-nutritionist. Thankfully, all this has changed, and I have The Seed and Victoria Moran to thank.

The Seed is a plant-based nutrition expo/ conference based in New York- this years’ was held in early August in Soho. Dozens of vegan luminaries gather to speak, give demos and generally inspire us all. There are also scores of vendors showcasing their foods and services. I was lucky enough to attend both days thanks to my friend Sarah, amazing creator of the unparalleled Rescue Chocolate.

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Over the course of the weekend I was awed by incredible speakers, among them were Victoria Moran, JL Fields, Jenny Brown of Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary and Dr. Robert Ostfeld of the Montefiore Cardiac Wellness Program. Each of these lecturers left me feeling inspired and re-invigorated in my own plant-based nutrition mission. Months later I still revisit their talks in my mind.

So what does this have to do with green juice? I began my Seed experience at Victoria Moran’s talk on the subject of aging gracefully inside and out. If there’s anyone who is an authority there, it is Ms. Moran, as she is gorgeous, eternally youthful and full of vitality. Each time I hear her speak I hang on her every word- she’s not only entertaining but oh so wise. And she’s one of those women who simply glows. Seriously, her skin is just luminescent.

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During her talk, she lauded the power of green juice. “When you’re feeling like that latte at 3pm- get yourself a green juice instead. And then if you still feel like the latte, have that, but I’m pretty sure you won’t.”  Yes, I love my soy latte. But if Victoria’s regimen has anything to do with that unbelievable glow, I’m willing to give it a shot.

So I started drinking green right after her talk. (I went for the smoothie and not the juice, but I still drank my veggies. More on the difference to come) It was a pineapple-orange-spinach coconut water blend and it was my epiphany. I chased that with several other juice & smoothie samples over the two days at the Seed, I particularly loved the Green Mustache orange mango smoothie.

One of the fragrant green smoothies I sampled at the Seed. Orange mango and greens, another combo I need to make at home!

One of the fragrant green smoothies I sampled at the Seed. Orange mango and greens, another combo I need to make at home!

Still I didn’t believe that this sweet green elixir could ever replace my latte or sundry caffeine/ chocolate fix. But wouldn’t you know, it eventually did just that. There I was yesterday, late afternoon, standing at the refrigerator, poised to eat a piece of chocolate when it hit me. I don’t really want chocolate, I want ANOTHER green smoothie! Yes, two green smoothies in one day- I’m still in shock.

(btw, this is not to say there’s anything wrong with chocolate, but when I want chocolate it’s generally because I have low blood sugar.  Chocolate isn’t going to fix that in the long run.)

 And then miraculously, I actually went for two days in a row without coffee. So yes, Victoria was completely spot on.

The inaugural green smoothie at the Seed

The inaugural green smoothie at the Seed

Why should we drink green smoothies & juices anyway? The same reason we need to eat our veggies. Most Americans eat less than one serving of fruits and vegetables daily. No wonder we are so sick- vegetables are really not optional. The micronutrients and phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables are integral to so many of the basic metabolic processes our bodies perform everyday.

We may not initially see the damage we do our bodies by depriving ourselves of these vital nutrients. But it catches up with us eventually, and may manifest in any number of forms from obesity to osteoporosis to cancer.

In fact the risk of cancer decreases with an increased intake of fruits and vegetables, and the earlier in life one begins eating large amounts of these foods, the more protection one has. So really, we should try to get in as many servings of fruits and veggies as we possibly can. Even the five a day recommendation is really conservative.

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Here’s why smoothies are so amazing. If you really tried, you could probably get in 10 servings of fruits and veggies into one 12 oz glass. My smoothies have at least four or five. I try to get in at least three servings of green veggies along with a fruit or two. Your green smoothie will provide you with iron, calcium, protein, and so many other important vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

And why am I touting smoothies and not necessarily juice? Juice is great too, I drink juices now and then when I’m out and about. But I chose to buy a Vitamix because making smoothies retains all of the fiber, and phytochemicals work synergistically with the fiber to which they are bound.  Drinking the vegetables and fruits in their whole forms can be even more powerful than drinking the nutrients stripped from the fiber, which occurs in juicing.

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And fiber is incredibly important of it’s own accord- it helps in cancer prevention, in maintaining good cholesterol levels, a healthy weight, and healthy blood sugar levels. And remember, we only get fiber through plant foods.

Another plus for the smoothie side- many nutrients are fat soluble, so they are more bioavailable in the presence of healthful fats. Adding a little coconut or almond milk to your smoothie will help your body soak up all those vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients from the fruits and vegetables. But please, don’t add cow’s milk (or any other animal’s) as dairy inhibits our uptake of phytonutrients.

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Nowadays my first stop in the morning is the Vitamix. Even before I have my tea! It took a wee bit of experimenting but I’ve arrived at my favorite combination of ingredients. I do vary it a bit, but my eye opening smoothie needs a base of pineapple, spinach and coconut in some form. I suggest:

2 or 3 two-inch slices of pineapple (roughly 1/8 of a medium pineapple)

3 cups baby spinach

1 small orange

1/2 cup coconut water

3 coconut water ice cubes (just pour coconut water into an ice cube tray, and voila!)

30 seconds in the Vitamix and there you have it- delectable green power.

For variation, sometimes I’ll add some mango or some frozen organic berries. But beware! Berries will turn your juice brown. While it still tastes divine, it makes me sad to lose that green hue.

So thank you Victoria- I’m finally on team green. Hope you, dear reader, will join us!

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High Protein Plant Powered Breakfast

I’m back, with an epic post that has something for everyone. If you’re tired of answering “where do you get your protein?” you can officially defer to this post. If you’ve ever wondered where a vegan gets her protein, you’re in the right place. And if you simply want an easy recipe to start (or end!) your day with all the macro and micronutrients you need, this is also a good place to start.

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This week I decided to switch my old cereal breakfast for a bigger bulk, higher protein (more specifically, higher lysine-keep reading!) higher fiber, higher phytochemical breakfast that would sustain me through the day.

For the longest time I had the same breakfast, it went something like this- in a big bowl: an apple or some kind of fruit chopped, Ezekiel cereal & low fat granola mix, flax seeds, about 1/4 cup hazelnuts, some raisins and goji berries in almond milk. Pretty healthful, but not really satisfying for very long. Often I’d be hungry directly after eating that cereal, but when I ordered a hearty tofu scramble at weekend brunch, I’d barely be hungry for dinner.

The original breakfast, still a good one but lacking in  staying power.

The original breakfast, still a good one but lacking in staying power.

Part of the inspiration for the new breakfast was last Sunday’s brunch. I finally made it over to Champs, a killer vegan diner in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. My fabulous brunch cohort Michelle had the obvious advantage as she’s eating for two! I was sort of jealous of her state on this particular trip, as it’s impossible to make a decision off their profuse menu.

 Inside Champs

Inside Champs. Excuse low-qual iPhone photos in this section!

Champs is a stellar establishment- you can get anything from a very imaginative tofu scramble to pancakes to biscuits and gravy to a pancake SANDWICH! They also have veggie burgers and inventive salads – definitely the most amazing kale salad dressing I’ve ever had. And that means a lot coming from someone who doesn’t love a kale salad. The atmosphere is also pretty groovy, and there’s a pretty neat scene too. For all this there’s obviously a wait on the weekend, but nothing is more worthwhile. Don’t forget the fact that they have unbelievable desserts. Which you’ll love if you have a modicum of room after brunch. (Probably not gonna happen.)

The lovely Michelle ready for a brunch throwdown!

The lovely Michelle and I prepare for a brunch throwdown!

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After much deliberation, I decided on the tofu scramble with potatoes, mushrooms, onions, and veg sausage. (you can choose your own scrambling ingredients- more tough decisions!) Now there are tofu scrambles and there are tofu scrambles. It doesn’t take much to put some tofu into a pan, but the spices and techniques involved play a major role in its success. In fact, the day before I ate at Blossom, who for $15 gives you about 2 tablespoons of mediocre, uninspired tofu scramble. I literally left hungry, and it wasn’t anywhere near as delectible as Champs. (for brunch at Blossom, order the breakfast burrito. You can’t lose there.)

 A perfect tofu scramble and accompaniments

A perfect tofu scramble and accompaniments

Champs selfie as Michelle orders a takeout cupcake for her man.

Champs selfie as Michelle orders a takeout cupcake for her man.

Getting back to this breakfast transition. My default upon awakening, as is the default for many, is to go straight for the sweeter, higher carbohydrate foods. But that’s just because my body is craving glucose, the building block of all body operations. Eating something with more bulk and protein is a good technique for longer sustained energy. Particularly if you’re heading out for some exercise- I need that energy for my long swims these days.

This tofu scramble recipe, served with smoky black beans and greens, (if you like, in a whole-grain tortilla like Ezekiel) gives you a heap of protein, and it’s very high in the amino acid Lysine. Lysine is an essential amino acid, one we must get from foods. It’s one of the more important building blocks our body uses to synthesize protein, and it’s also incredibly important for maintaining bone health. While it’s easy to get enough Lysine on a vegan diet, it does take a modicum of planning. However, when we get enough lysine, chances are we’re going to be set for protein for the day. So you cut two carrots with one knife.

Foods that are high in lysine include tofu, tempeh, soy meats, lentils, and seitan, next in line are other legumes. Decent sources include quinoa, pistachios, and pumpkin seeds. If you’re interested in learning your exact Lysine needs, consult the handy dandy table over at Jack Norris’ phenomenal site.

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Energy for a busy day!

I decided to geek out and do a nutritional analysis of my original breakfast compared to my proposed long-term energy breakfast. And then for good measure, I threw in the average Standard American Diet (S.A.D) breakfast with a caloric equivalent to the tofu scramble breakfast. The SAD breakfast: 2 hard boiled eggs, 3 strips of bacon, 2 slices of white toast and 1 Tbsp of butter.

While my cereal had ample protein, calcium, fiber and a plenty of other micronutrients, calorie for calorie, it doesn’t supply much by way of antioxidants, lysine and a number of vitamins. On the other hand, weighing in at 150 calories less than my cereal, the scramble breakfast provides a whopping 86% of my protein requirements for the day, (take that protein skeptics!) a good deal of which is lysine. Close to all of the protein I need, half of the iron and more than half the calcium, plus vitamin and phytochemical levels that are off the charts. All at around 25% of the recommended calories for the day. That’s nutrient density people!

So let’s take a look at the SAD breakfast. Sure, there’s lots of protein, (but ahem, far less than the plant-powered breakfast!) but it’s animal protein which has been linked to a bevy of diseases, including cancer. Add that to the fact that the SAD breakfast is devoid of phytonutrients that protect us from cancer – (they are only found in plant foods) so we have cancer risk with no cancer protection. You also get some trans-fat, and even the most conservative government- sponsored USDA people can’t advise a tolerable upper limit for that substance. Talk about a recipe for disaster.

Along with that animal protein comes 68% of the day’s saturated fat (compared to 5% on the plant-based breakfast, but it’s apples and oranges since plant-based fat does not pose the same risk of animal fat) and 481 mg of cholesterol. Plant based foods have no cholesterol. I could compare so many other aspects of these two meals, but it would be more of a paper than a post. You can view the breakdown yourself below. Scroll below the comparison to get to the recipes.2-Day_Comparison_Reportsm 2-Day_Comparison_Report-2

So let’s cook! As always, I recommend using all organic ingredients. Particularly the onions, peppers and tomatoes- some of the highest in pesticides. And always organic soy so it’s non-gmo.

Tofu Scramble adapted from The Vegan Table by Colleen Patrick-Goudreau

Makes 4-6 portions

Ingredients:

1 pkg Nasoya light firm tofu (or organic tofu of your choice)

1 Field Roast apple sage sausage, chopped into 1/4 inch rounds

1 tsp olive oil

1 pkg crimini mushrooms, sliced

1 onion, chopped

1 clove garlic, chopped

1 red bell pepper, chopped

2 tbsp Nutritional Yeast (or more for a cheesier taste)

1/2  tsp paprika

1/2 tsp Tumeric, for the yellow color. (I didn’t use it here, but for the photos sake I should have!)

salt & pepper

optional(well, mandatory really 🙂 Sriacha or other hot sauce for serving, extra Nutritional Yeast.

Method:

Before cooking, drain the tofu: Place tofu on a plate between two folded paper towels, then cover with a second plate. You can also place any sort of weight on top of the plate. Allow tofu to drain while you prepare the vegetables.

Heat oil in a sauté pan. Add onion and garlic and sauté for two minutes. Add mushrooms and pepper and sauté until the peppers and mushrooms are tender.

Meanwhile, using your hands, crumble the tofu in a bowl to create the consistency of course breadcrumbs.

Add to pan and stir to combine. And sausage, spices and nutritional yeast and sauté for about five minutes, stirring occasionally. Cook (uncovered) until tofu and sausage are heated through.

For crispier sausage, sauté (can be dry sauté) in a frying pan and incorporate at just before serving.

next…

Easy Smoky Beans *plus* how-to soak and cook dry beans.

Canned beans can also be used here, just buy them organic and in BPA-free cans.

Ingredients:

1 cup dry black beans

2 chopped tomatoes (or about 10 oz canned)

1/4 tsp liquid smoke

dash of sea salt

optional: 1-2 Tbsp Nutritional Yeast sriacha or other Hot sauce

Note: These beans also taste great with some onion or garlic, but because they’re also in the scramble I don’t include aromatics here. If you serve them with something else, try either or both during the second half hour of cooking.

Method:

Prep the beans: Soak overnight. Discard water. Very important, unless you want to offend yourself and those around you with horrible gas!

Place soaked beans and fresh water in a pot. For every cup of soaked beans add 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer 10 minutes. Cover the beans and simmer on low for about an hour, or until beans are soft.

Add chopped tomato, liquid smoke and a pinch of salt. Cook until tomatoes are soft. If desired, add 1-2 Tbsps nutritional yeast for added depth. And hot sauce, always hot sauce!


Serve it all up with a heap of steamed kale or collard greens, and if you like, roll it into an Ezekiel tortilla. It’s really a perfect breakfast. Enjoy! Full breakfast nutrition info below. And if you’re here in New York City, visit Champs, you won’t be sorry.

The nutrition info below is for 1/5 of the scramble recipe, 1/3 cup black beans, 1 mini Ezekiel tortllla, and 2 cups Kale.

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Grown Up Antioxidant Slushie

vvpLOGO*A big welcome to you, virtual vegan potluck attendee! Thanks for stopping by. This recipe, an ode to beets and sweets, fit in with the potluck’s featured ingredient. But please do have a look around my blog if you like what you see here!*

I had a ridiculous sweet tooth as a kid- so bad that I recall most of my juvenile activities in the context of the garbage I put into my mouth. I can still feel my feet on the warm concrete as I stood in line at the Scarsdale Pool snack bar. French fries and ketchup wafted around me in the queue as I tried to decide- Fun Dip or those greasy fries?  Fun Dip invariably won out- I mean, it’s an activity as well as “food!” I didn’t love Sugarbush ski school, but I did look forward to a break in the toasty lodge, a mammoth chocolate chip cookie and a cup of hot chocolate in my icy hands. And after weekly figure skating lessons, I recall teetering off the ice to inexplicably consume some sugary ice. I was a sucker for a Slush Puppie.

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For those unfamiliar- Slush Puppies are like Slurpees (and I had my fill of those too, once I got to high school)- the ingredient list likely reads: high fructose corn syrup, red dye # 3 and/or  Blue #2, water. Freeze that up, swirl it around in a machine, throw in a cute doggie mascot and the kids start tugging at mom for the cash.

Many slurps later I am decidedly more conscious as to what goes in my mouth. It’s been a long haul, but since I’ve been vegan, new and healthy foods  become part of my repertoire frequently- my last hurdle was to accept veggie juices & smoothies. I spent two years talking myself out of a Vitamix, but finally ran out of convincing excuses a few weeks ago. One charge later, I am the proud mama of that gorgeous invention.

Lovely organic beets from the Union Square farmer's market.

Lovely organic beets from the Union Square farmer’s market.

Back to those Slush Puppies. I’ve been fine-tuning my juiceblend procedure over the last couple of weeks since the Vitamix has resided on my counter. Let me tell you, there is a serious learning curve here people! On first attempt my beet-carrot- pineapple juice was reminiscent of borscht. Drinkable, and certainly tasty, but more food than drink. With the addition of ice, several successive attempts yielded what might be described as pink- tinged carrot dressing. (I consumed it, sans salad.)

But today, I am in juice heaven. Doubling up on ice and extra process time yielded the perfect texture and flavor. The happy surprise was that lovely icey nostalgia of what could be called a grown up Slush Puppie. (Slush Dog?) With a glass of this slushy juice in hand, I can hear the comical tunes of the skaterink organist in 1982. Gone is the syrupy sweetness of youth’s slush, but the dayglo color is still here! (Even more beautiful, I think.) I mean, just look at that gorgeous pink. That’s the phenomenal phytochemical power in the beets.

Did you know that beets rank highest of all veggies in antioxidant concentration? At least as far as we know- in the most recent study, beets won out over the previous ruling champion, spinach, in antioxidant content. Beets get their color from betacyanins, powerful phytonutrients that protect plants from UV exposure and disease. And guess what? Those same phytonutrients protect us from disease. Diseases like cancer.

 Just as yummy slightly melted. Love the layers of concentrated, pulpy and icey.

Just as yummy slightly melted. Love the layers of concentrated, pulpy and icey.

Beetroots are a stellar source of folic acid, fiber, manganese and potassium. But don’t forget about the greens attached to those roots! Both the greens and roots are great source of magnesium, phosphorus, some iron and vitamin B6. (However not all of the iron can be absorbed due to the high concentration of oxalates in beets, so you don’t want to count on this plant exclusively for iron.) The greens are even higher in nutritional value than beetroots – they’re richer in calcium, iron and vitamins A & C. So eat both the root and the greens- a quick steam or a toss in a pan with olive oil and garlic is all you need.

The sweetness and tang of the pineapple is a lovely compliment to the beet’s earthiness. And you can just feel your body taking in those anti-cancer nutrients, thanking you with every sip.
The first glass is full on slushy, but as it melts the texture and flavor becomes even more complex, yielding layers of frozen, semi-frozen and melted- it’s almost a slushy parfait. I just loved seeing the layers of vibrant pink.
It feels kind of decadent, but it’s just so good for you. And in a way taking care of yourself is decadent experience too. So indulge away!

Had to show you that beautiful texture close up.
Had to show you that beautiful texture close up.

A note on the (very simple) ingredient list. Go organic with your beets. This gorgeous magenta root will be pulverized raw, giving you a huge boost of nutrients, but if he’s commercial, you’ll also get a nice dose of neurotoxins. Organic beets are cheap anyway- here in price engorged New York City, I get a ridiculous bunch of 12 beets for a mere $3.50 at the farmer’s market, with so many greens they won’t fit in the crisper. That’s enough juice for more than a week plus 2 or more servings of greens! Don’t skimp on your body, people.
The pineapple is theoretically ok to buy conventional, as they have tough skins and are less desirable to insects, thus fewer pesticides are needed. But if you can find organic, that’s always ideal.

So here we go.
Yields 1 1/2 pints- enough for two, but certainly drinkable by one!

Ingredients:
1 large beetroot (preferably organic)
1/4 pineapple
1 1/2 to 2 cups ice

variation: use 1 cup ice and 1 cup frozen coconut water. It will be slightly sweeter, so if you enjoy the sweetness level as is, use less pineapple or more beets!

Remove the greens from your beetroot- if you like (and you should!) reserve the greens for dinner. No need to peel your beetroots. When cutting your pineapple, keep the core in there. (fiber!the crowning glory of blended juice) Cut the beet in a few chunks- same for the pineapple. Throw beets, then pineapple, then ice into a Vitamix.
Squish down ingredients with the tamper- the beets and ice will take a little pushing just to get them going. Process on high for about 60 seconds- not much longer or you’ll just have juice.

Pour into glasses and drink immediately! Yum. Pink mustache removal is optional.

ps. While I call this “grown up,” I’m certain kids will love this juice too! What kid doesn’t love a sweet, icy treat? A perfect way to trick them into super healthy veggies.

What’s your favorite juice? Would love to hear.

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